1. Worlds + Story + Screen

1. Worlds + Story + Screen
Campbell - Known World of Common Day 1. Campbell - Belly of Whale Field + McKee - Act 1 - Set Up 1. Vogler - Ordinary World 1. Snyder - Current State - Before Story 1. Snyder - Bizarro World 1. Vogler - Special World 1. Field + McKee - Act 2 1. Overview 2. IntrOverview

Campbell - Known World of Common Day

1. Campbell - Belly of Whale

Where Frobenius recognizes the recurring story of being swallowed by a whale as a structure of day and night, Campbell builds on the psychological and metaphorical implications of being swallowed by the whale.

Field + McKee - Act 1 - Set Up

1. Vogler - Ordinary World

1. Snyder - Current State - Before Story

1. Snyder - Bizarro World

1. Vogler - Special World

1. Field + McKee - Act 2

1. Overview

Campbell, Field, McKee, Vogler, Snyder – these are the leading voices in the world of Hollywood storytelling, and they’re all getting at something very similar.

Characters often start in what Campbell calls the Known World of Common Day and Secular Life—the Social Order. Vogler calls it the Ordinary World, Normal Environment, Mundane World, World of Everyday Affairs, and Background. It provides Context and what Field and McKee describe as the Set Up. For Blake Snyder, who is responding to Campbell and Vogler, he describes this as the Current State or World Before the Story.

This normality sets up what Vogler calls a “Baseline for Comparison” or “Contrast” with the “Special World.” Snyder calls it the “Bizarro World” and Campbell describes it as the “Belly of the Whale.” This is the world of adventure. Think about the black and white of Kansas and Oz or Harry Potter’s broom closet and Hogwarts, Wendy’s Nursery and Peter Pan’s Neverland, Alice’s life and Wonderland, Charlie’s paper route and the Chocolate Factory. These are hugely contrasting worlds that really draw out these distinctions. The starting places in these stories is always drab, common, boring, mundane, everyday, routine, and so on while the fantasy world is colorful, bizarre and totally immersive.

But these patterns apply to dramas as much as they do dreams. Think about the Glass Menagerie, for example. The main character hardly leaves the house, but for her, it’s immersive, bizarre and special to have a man into her environment, which is, otherwise, immaculately careful. Love stories are easy examples. Falling in love can turn any mundane common boring place into a special immersive and bizarre shared world. And the normal of before will be but the point of departure on this new adventure. In Dirty Dancing, for example, they don’t go to a fantasy world, they just fall in love through dance. This creates a special world of dance and passion that is completely unlike the repressed and lifeless country club environment of their daily lives.

What I don’t want you to do is try and memorize all these terms and who said what or anything like that. I want you to comprehend what all these terms are pointing to together. If you think you’ve got to remember all the terms, then each new term makes this class harder. Instead, I want you to see each new term as additional guidance towards an instinctual relationship with story. It won’t all come at once, but it’ll be natural to you by the end of class.

2. IntrOverview

Campbell, Field, McKee, Vogler, Snyder – these are the leading voices in the world of Hollywood storytelling, and they’re all getting at something very similar.

Characters often start in what Campbell calls the Known World of Common Day and Secular Life—the Social Order. Vogler calls it the Ordinary World, Normal Environment, Mundane World, World of Everyday Affairs, and Background. It provides Context and what Field and McKee describe as the Set Up. For Blake Snyder, who is responding to Campbell and Vogler, he describes this as the Current State or World Before the Story.

This normality sets up what Vogler calls a “Baseline for Comparison” or “Contrast” with the “Special World.” Snyder calls it the “Bizarro World” and Campbell describes it as the “Belly of the Whale.” This is the world of adventure. Think about the black and white of Kansas and Oz or Harry Potter’s broom closet and Hogwarts, Wendy’s Nursery and Peter Pan’s Neverland, Alice’s life and Wonderland, Charlie’s paper route and the Chocolate Factory. These are hugely contrasting worlds that really draw out these distinctions. The starting places in these stories is always drab, common, boring, mundane, everyday, routine, and so on while the fantasy world is colorful, bizarre and totally immersive.

But these patterns apply to dramas as much as they do dreams. Think about the Glass Menagerie, for example. The main character hardly leaves the house, but for her, it’s immersive, bizarre and special to have a man into her environment, which is, otherwise, immaculately careful. Love stories are easy examples. Falling in love can turn any mundane common boring place into a special immersive and bizarre shared world. And the normal of before will be but the point of departure on this new adventure. In Dirty Dancing, for example, they don’t go to a fantasy world, they just fall in love through dance. This creates a special world of dance and passion that is completely unlike the repressed and lifeless country club environment of their daily lives.

What I don’t want you to do is try and memorize all these terms and who said what or anything like that. I want you to comprehend what all these terms are pointing to together. If you think you’ve got to remember all the terms, then each new term makes this class harder. Instead, I want you to see each new term as additional guidance towards an instinctual relationship with story. It won’t all come at once, but it’ll be natural to you by the end of class.