11. Reveal Inner Character Visually

11. Reveal Inner Character Visually
Reveal Inner Character Visually Reveal Inner Character Visually - Clip

Reveal Inner Character Visually

“A novelist can enter a character's mind and in first- or third-person delineate inner conflict directly in prose description. The screenwriter cannot. The screenwriting is the art of making the mental physical. We create visual correlatives for inner conflict-not dialogue or narration to describe ideas and emotions, but images of character choice and action to indirectly and ineffably express the thoughts and feelings within. Therefore, the interior life a novel must be reinvented for the screen” (230-231 McKee).

  Story is “a process that reveals character. Film is a visual medium. You must find ways to reveal your character's conflicts visually. You cannot reveal what you don't know. Thus, it's important to make the distinction between knowing your character as a thought, notion, or idea in your head and revealing him or her on paper” (47 Field). “Because we're telling a story in pictures, we must show how the character acts and reacts to the incidents and events that he-she confronts and overcomes (or doesn't overcome) during the story line” (47 Field).

 

DON’T TELL WHAT CAN BE SHOWN: “We must remember that, unlike the theatre where we hope our work will be performed in hundreds, if not thousands of productions, here and abroad, now and into the future, on screen there will be only one production, only one performance of each character fixed on film forever. Writer/actor collaboration begins when the writer stops dreaming of a fictional face and instead imagines the ideal casting. If a writer feels that a particular actor would be his ideal protagonist and he envisions her while he writes, he'll be constantly reminded of how little superb actors need to create powerful moments, and won't write this: BARBARA (offering Jack a cup) Would you like this cup of coffee, darling? The audience sees it's a cup of coffee; the gesture says, ‘Would you like this?’; the actress is feeling "darling ... ‘Sensing that less is more, the actress will turn to her director and say: "Larry, do I have to say 'Would you like this cup of coffee, darling?’ I mean, I'm offering the damn cup, right? Could we just cut that line?’ The line is cut, the actress sets the screen on fire silently offering a man a cup of coffee, while the screenwriter rages, ‘They're butchering my dialogue!’” (383-384 McKee).

 

A novelist can enter a character’s mind very easily T

Screenwriting is an art of making the mental physical T

Reveal Inner Character Visually - Clip

“A novelist can enter a character's mind and in first- or third-person delineate inner conflict directly in prose description. The screenwriter cannot. The screenwriting is the art of making the mental physical. We create visual correlatives for inner conflict-not dialogue or narration to describe ideas and emotions, but images of character choice and action to indirectly and ineffably express the thoughts and feelings within. Therefore, the interior life a novel must be reinvented for the screen” (230-231 McKee).

  Story is “a process that reveals character. Film is a visual medium. You must find ways to reveal your character's conflicts visually. You cannot reveal what you don't know. Thus, it's important to make the distinction between knowing your character as a thought, notion, or idea in your head and revealing him or her on paper” (47 Field). “Because we're telling a story in pictures, we must show how the character acts and reacts to the incidents and events that he-she confronts and overcomes (or doesn't overcome) during the story line” (47 Field).

 

DON’T TELL WHAT CAN BE SHOWN: “We must remember that, unlike the theatre where we hope our work will be performed in hundreds, if not thousands of productions, here and abroad, now and into the future, on screen there will be only one production, only one performance of each character fixed on film forever. Writer/actor collaboration begins when the writer stops dreaming of a fictional face and instead imagines the ideal casting. If a writer feels that a particular actor would be his ideal protagonist and he envisions her while he writes, he'll be constantly reminded of how little superb actors need to create powerful moments, and won't write this: BARBARA (offering Jack a cup) Would you like this cup of coffee, darling? The audience sees it's a cup of coffee; the gesture says, ‘Would you like this?’; the actress is feeling "darling ... ‘Sensing that less is more, the actress will turn to her director and say: "Larry, do I have to say 'Would you like this cup of coffee, darling?’ I mean, I'm offering the damn cup, right? Could we just cut that line?’ The line is cut, the actress sets the screen on fire silently offering a man a cup of coffee, while the screenwriter rages, ‘They're butchering my dialogue!’” (383-384 McKee).

 

A novelist can enter a character’s mind very easily T

Screenwriting is an art of making the mental physical T